Middle Street School continued …

In the last post we looked at a couple of famous pupils of the school at the time the Dinnis family would have lived in Middle Street. In this post we shall look at the everyday life of the school. The pictures and information come from the school website, there is much more to see under ‘History’ on the site: www.middlestreet.org

Mr R.B Bessant, Headmaster 1836-1861

Mr R.B Bessant, Headmaster 1836-1861

Here is a plan of the classroom, from the school website:http://www.middlestreet.org/mshistory/sketchplan.htm

The Curriculum

In 1851 the school formed ‘classes for Superior Instruction’; while charitable contributions still covered the costs of those ‘unable to provide for themselves’, wealthier parents could purchase more advanced classes for their children. The schemes of work under this development were:

BOY’S SCHOOL

The first class of instruction includes Spelling, Reading from boards, Writing, Arithmetic, Grammar, Outlines of Geography, English History, and Singing. Terms, as at present, Twopence per week.

The second class includes all the subjects fo the first class carried further: also Ancient and Modern History, Sciences, and Useful Arts, Natural History, rudiments of Drawing and Singing by notes. Terms, fourpence a week.

The third class includes all the second class carried still further; also Mental Arithmetic, Book-keeping and Mercantile Correspondence, English Composition, rudiments of Mathematics, Physical and Scriptural Geography, Geometry, Mechanics and Mapping. Terms, sixpence per week.

GIRLS’S SCHOOL

The first class includes Spelling, Reading from boards, Writing on slates, Arithmetic, Outlines of Geography and English History, Plain Needlework and Singing. Terms at present, three-halfpence per week.

The second class includes all the subjects of the first class carried further; also Ancient and Modern History, Mental Arithmetic, Physical and Scriptural Geography, Singing by notes and Knitting. Terms threepence a week.

From the book ‘The Middle Street School, Brighton, 1805-1905’ by Geo. Haffenden   p. 83

http://www.middlestreet.org/mshistory/curric1851.htm

About Jackie Dinnis

Welcome to my blog where I am enjoying meeting my family - past and present - one at a time. Join me as I learn who my ancestors were, where they lived, what their occupations were and what everyday life was like for them.
This entry was posted in Catherine Ann Dinnis, Charlotte Harriet Dinnis, Charlotte Robinson, Fanny Dinnis, George Dinnis, Harry Dinnis, John Dinnis, John Henry Dinnis and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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