Embroidered Silk Postcards sent home from Joseph Taylor Dinnis in World War One

NaBloPoMo_1115_465x287_THEMEMy grandfather, Joseph Taylor Dinnis fought in both World Wars. I am currently trying to find more information about where he was during World Was 1, his records seem to have been lost. But what we do have in the family archives (thanks to cousin Sue) are a few photographs and some beautiful embroidered silk postcards that he sent home. By looking at the cards and photographs again I am wondering if I can learn any more about Joseph’s time spent in WW1.

Happy Birthday

Happy Birthday

Souvenir de Belgique

Souvenir de Belgique

Souvenir with hidden pocket containing small card

Souvenir with hidden pocket containing small card

To my dear sister with small card in pocket

To my dear sister with small card in pocket

Sweet Remembrance with pocket and small card

Sweet Remembrance with pocket and small card

One of the silk cards has ‘Souvenir de Belgique’ embroidered on the front, and checking the photographs of Joseph Taylor Dinnis we can confirm he was in Belgium at some point.

La Louviere, Belgium February 1919 Joseph Taylor Dinnis

La Louviere, Belgium
February 1919
Joseph Taylor Dinnis

La Louviere, Belgium Feb 1919 'To my dear Nance (his name for Annie, his wife) with fondest love.'

La Louviere, Belgium
Feb 1919
‘To my dear Nance (his name for Annie, his wife) with fondest love.’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oswald Werder, La Louviere

Photographer Oswald Werder, La Louviere

For further information about the silk postcards I found a couple of websites helpful, their details are at the end of this post.

Silk embroidered postcards originated around 1900 at the Paris Exhibition. They were most popular during World War 1, when they were created by French and Belgian women who sold them as souvenirs to the soldiers on the Western Front.

The designs include flags, butterfly wings, bird plumage, rainbows, forget-me-not and pansy flowers, bluebirds and regimental caps and badges.

Originally made in the homes of women and girls and in refugee camps, as demand increased the production was transferred to factories. It is so nice to see and hold these original cards sent home by my grandfather, showing that he was always thinking of his loved one’s back home.

http://www.libraryofbirmingham.com/silkembroideredpostcards

http://www.iwm.org.uk/history/embroidered-silk-postcards

 

About Jackie Dinnis

Welcome to my blog where I am enjoying meeting my family - past and present - one at a time. Join me as I learn who my ancestors were, where they lived, what their occupations were and what everyday life was like for them.
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